Epson Brightlink Pro 1410Wi Interactive Projector Review

The Pens

Click to Enlarge. So close.

If you do install the software on your laptop, or PC, you will need to connect the projector to your computer via a USB Type B cable, that is included. Once that is set up, you use Epson’s speccial pens (two provided), to either control the projector, for interactive use, or switch to computer mouse mode.  The pen at the touch of an onscreen icon, will function as a remote mouse or a pen tool. The whole set of provided pen controls are very intuitive, from varying line thickness, to erasing, to changing colors, to using undo and redo features, saving, capturing and printing.

Click Image to Enlarge

Above, image of one of Epson’s interactive pens.  They run on pen light AA batteries.  For convenience, I found a set of four rechargeable AA batteries, and a charger packed with the projector.  That should save a lot of conventional batteries.

One thing to note.  Let’s say you put up a web page.  If you are working off a computer or other source, and you do some annotating, beware of the Brightlink Pro 1410 Wi’s zoom commands, which you can call up with and zoom in or out with one of the pens, or the remote control.

Let’s say you decide to highlight a few words, but then decide to zoom in the image.  Well, the image will zoom – the center will get larger, but your annotations will stay where they are.  So, since the text you highlighted moved significantly when you zoomed, the highlight will be in the same place, and no longer be highlighting the text as intended.  Whiteboard functionality is a bit different, so there are benefits for example, if you zoom in first, capture and drop the image into whiteboard mode, and annotate from there.  Now an option that would scale annotations to match the zoom might be interesting.

Brightlink Pro 1410 Wifi Interactivity

A small module plugs into the area near the inputs of the Epson Brightlink Pro projector to add Wifi capability to the projector.  We’ve worked with capability several times before with other Epson interactive projectors.  Using Epson’s Apple version of their iPresentation app, you can use an iPhone, iPad, or iTouch, or for you Android folks, there’s a version of iPresentation for your devices.

With iPresentation you can control the projector remotely, say with your Apple iPad, but you can also present some types of content from your iOS device.  (Android is more lenient, as to what you can access to project.)   The Apple iOS devices are more restrictive as part of Apple’s much tighter security for their eco-system, which helps prevent malware, viruses, and other disasters from infecting Apple devices.  Android will let you access more, but by doing so, there’s a potentially much larger security risk.  Since this is a “corporate” boardroom type projector, I imagine IT folks will be happier to see iOS rather than Android devices working with the projector, especially since the Epson Brightlink Pro 1410 projector is likely hooked up to the corporate network.

We are iOS folks here. It was easy.  For example, no issue projecting a series of images in my iPad.

Wifi can also be used with computers, of course, to do wireless presentations. “Cable free” wireless presenting from my MacBook Pro worked as expected.  I didn’t mess but briefly with videos, but throughput was rather good, although certainly in my facility there wasn’t quite enough throughput to do a full screen 1080p video without some minor pauses.  Our wifi network here with repeater, is one generation before 802.11n, so not quite as fast as it could be. The fault should be our wifi, not the Epson.  Lower resolution videos should be no trouble at all.

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