Epson Home Cinema 710 HD Home Theater Projector Review

Home Cinema 710 Projector – The Lack of 3D

The Home Cinema 710 is 2D only.  If you want 3D, there are plenty of choices, including the more expensive Epson HC3010, which we consider an excellent value at about $1500  There are, however, 3D capable projectors starting mostly from above $1000.

Digital zoom

The digital zoom feature allows you to magnify any portion of the screen up to eight times, essentially at maximum magnification 1/64 of the screen area, and fill the screen. This is a portable business projector type of feature and one of the reasons I call this a crossover type of projector. You certainly can use it to zoom in close when watching those football replays to see if the ball was caught inbounds.

Color Controls

This Epson Home Cinema 710 lacks a full color management system.  There’s not even a Color Saturation control, although there are a fair number of color adjustments available. On the bright side, this projector is primarily for folks who just want a respectable – not a enthusiasts’ or purists’ quality picture, and aren’t likely to own calibration equipment, or plan to spend up to half of what the projector costs to have someone calibrate it.  There are several preset color modes.  We will discuss Picture Quality in the Image quality page.

Home Cinema 710 Gaming Abilities

As this goes to press, the Epson Home Cinema 710 will be shipped on its way to one of our Gamer bloggers who will blog about lag times and how well this projector works for various types of gaming. Once that is posted on one of our blogs, (you can access all our blogs from our home page), a link will also be added here, directly to that blog with advice for gamers considering this projector.  Look back for gaming results before mid-August (2012).

Overscan

This is a feature that allows the projector to crop the image slightly.  It’s used for eliminating image noise that appears around the edges (that’s not uncommon with standard definition TV channels coming off of satellite or cable).   It works as advertised!

HDMI Input

Interesting.  There is only one -(that’s ok, there are switch boxes or AV receivers).  What I did notice was this, This Epson may not be allowing DC power to be pulled from the HDMI port.  Mind you, if a cable needs power, (smart cable) it normally pulls it from the source end, rather than the display.  The thing is, I use some super thin, super lightweight HDMI cables at times. These are from Redmere, but sold under many brand names (I believe even Monster now OEMs them).  Well to get 10 foot runs on something thinner than a strand of spagetti, their cable design pulls power from the display end.  I was not able to make the cable work.  I’ve had that same problem with almost every tiny Pico projector, for the same reason.  It makes a nice tech story, but otherwise, just don’t buy some super thin HDMI cable.  OK?

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