Epson Home Cinema 710 HD Home Theater Projector Review

Shadow Detail Performance

Shadow details are OK.  Not great.  Again, this projector is not built to be its best viewed in a near black room, where these differences are huge. In a setting such as the first photo you’ll find on the Screens page of this review, the big differences in black levels and shadow detail you see here, become very small differences. Many of you will gladly have that extra 500 – 1000 lumens instead of improved blacks and shadow detail.

Our first series of images is also a favorite for considering black levels, not just shadow detail. For this reason, note the brightness in the letterbox areas (for blacks). For shadow detail, look to the shrubs on the right, behind the tracks, and for details in the darkest area in the middle of the forest behind those tracks.

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Shadow Detail Performance Slideshow

Shadow Detail Performance

Epson Home Cinema 710HD

Shadow Detail Performance

Acer H6500

Shadow Detail Performance

Epson Home Cinema 3010: Epson's lowest priced 3D projector, $1599, is just a touch better at dark shadow detail, (and also a real advantage in blacks). (Note the woods on the right, despite the Epson image being a bit brighter)

Shadow Detail Performance

Panasonic PT-AR100U: This might be the equivalent tot he 710HD in a 1080p projector: It's the brightest in its range, and is also not known for its blacks or shadow detail. Still black levels are definitely better than the 710HD.

Shadow Detail Performance

Optoma HD33: A lot more money, but a good 2D/3D, DLP projector: Slightly better blacks, better detail

Shadow Detail Performance

Epson Home Cinema 8700UB: The old (now discontinued) black level champ of the projectors in the $2000ish and lower ranges, it obviously crushes the performance of the 710HD at both dark details and blacks. That makes sense, since Epson has 3 additional models priced betwen these two.

Shadow Detail Performance

Mitsubishi HC4000: A favorite among lower cost DLP projectosr, that sells for over $1000. A touch better shadow detail

Black Level and Shadow Detail Performance: HC 710HD Projector - Bottom Line

If these two categories are very important to you, then the 710HD is probably not the projector for you.  Of course, if that’s the case, you probably have a room with at least very good lighting control, even if the surfaces aren’t dark. And you probably are more interested in movies than HDTV and Sports.  For those wanting a bright projector in the daytime, with some ambient light, the brightness will likely be more important to you.

Epson Home Cinema 710HD - Overall Color & Picture Quality

First, we did calibrate this Epson Home Cinema 710HD.  The provided controls were not as complete as we would have liked, so we could not get a near “dead on” D65 calibration (6500K color temp).  The resulting image was overall a touch cool – especially in the lower IRE ranges (darker areas).  Personally, if there’s going to be a color shift in those dark areas, I do prefer they shift towards blue, instead of adding red.

If there’s a complaint it is that sometimes the image appears oversaturated.  Strangely, this Epson lacks a normal Color (saturation) control.  I can’t remember the last time I saw a home projector that didn’t have one, probably the predecessor of this 710HD.

Forgetting the technical side of things I’d have to say that skin tones, overall are very good.  Certainly this Epson should be able to hold its own with any of the LCDTVs in your home.  I’d have to say, they are really rather good when you consider this is an under $650 projector.

A mix of additional images to show off the Epson Home Cinema 710HD:

Forgetting the technical side of things I’d have to say that skin tones, overall are very good.  Certainly this Epson should be able to hold its own with any of the LCDTVs in your home.  I’d have to say, they are really rather good when you consider this is an under $650 projector.

While I’m not thrilled with black levels at all, and shadow detail is just OK, remember above we intentionally overexposed those dark images so you could see better.  Looking at the space picture immediately above, at normal exposure, you should understand that dark scenes are still dark.

Shadow detail is good! It’s about where you want it to be. Yes, all considered the HC 710HD could reveal a touch more in terms of dark shadow details, but we’re talking just a touch.

Here are a few assorted, additional images, some of which can be found on other recent reviews:

Skin tones really can look great.  No doubt that’s a reason why this review has a few more images from the Victoria Secret fashion show.

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