Epson MovieMate 60 Projector Review

We calibrate each home theater that is reviewed. The MovieMate 60 receives the most basic calibration. It has less color controls than we find on most projectors, and that results in less ability to perfect the color balance. Nonetheless, the Epson starts out with pretty good color, and our settings changes, though minor, do further improve color accuracy.

Color Temperature

As you can see, all modes but Auto, provide a color temp for white (100 IRE), that’s close to the ideal 6500K.

Interestingly, LivingRoom mode is a touch brighter than Dynamic, although LivingRoom does seem to have slightly better color accuracy.

Lumen Output and Color Temp at 100 IRE

Auto 678 @ 5440
Dynamic 1671 @ 6793
Living Room 1696 @ 6837
Game 1609 @ 6811
Theatre 1235 @ 6577

Auto has no adjustments
Lamp Mode=High (unless noted otherwise)
Dynamic Iris On (Iris off does not change measurements)
All other settings at default (untouched)

Basic Settings

Auto

 

Dynamic

 

Living Room

 

Game

 

Theatre
Contrast = (0)
N/A
0 -2 -4 0
Brightness = (0) N/A 0 0 0 0
Color = (0)
N/A
0 0 0 0
Tint = (0) N/A 0 0 0 0
Color Temp N/A
(Medium)
(Medium)
(Medium)
(Medium)

Below are all our image settings for the MovieMate 60 all-in-one projector system.

The numbers in parens are the default settings.

RGB Settings

The MovieMate 60 lacks R,G,B settings, so there’s nothing really, you can do to change the overall color temperature, other than switch from Medium to Low or High. Well, as it turns out, Medium is both the brightest, and the closest to ideal color temp.

Although we could not adjust the color temp, we could measure the range

Color Temp over IRE Range, Best Mode (Theatre)

20 IRE 6089
30 IRE 6295
40 IRE 6357
50 IRE 6414
60 IRE 6353
70 IRE 6406
80 IRE 6492
100 IRE 6577
Average gamma 2.0

Gamma, at 2.0 is a little low. That means areas that are of mid-brightness end up a touch brighter than if the projector had the targeted 2.2 gamma. Most dedicated projectors, one way or another, usually will allow getting at least as close as 2.1 or 2.3, however, 2.0 isn’t bad, and I’d rather see the lower number, than a higher one, such as 2.4 where images start getting a slightly dark feel to them, even sunny afternoon.

That’s all there is to it.

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