Mitsubishi HC9000D Projector Review

Mitsubishi has setup a network of CEDIA – local installing dealers to sell the HD9000D, so don’t expect it to be found online (at least not from authorized dealers). While Mitshibishi set a very high MSRP – $9995, the MAP – the minimum advertised price allowed – is $5995, which tends to approximate “street” price. Assuming MAP as the typical price, that places the Mitsubishi HC9000D in the middle of the pack, pricewise among competing 3D projectors, with one of the 3 JVCs, plus the just announced lower cost Sony, both priced lower, and the other two JVC’s and the VW90ES being priced well higher!

But, of course, price isn’t everything. The devil is in the details and the details include overall image quality, black levels, 3D, skin tone handling, and brightness, plus an extra feature or two. Let’s start exploring further!

Mitsubishi HC9000D Projector Highlights

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  • 1000 lumens claimed (and measured!)
  • Motorized wide range zoom lens
  • Vertical and horizontal lens shift (motorized)
  • 3D capable, including Blu-ray 3D
  • Ultra high contrast for superior black levels
  • Sold by authorized local dealers
  • Full color management system
  • Sylish, but large, piano finish
  • HDMI 1.4a compatibility
  • Creative Frame Interpolation – smooth motion
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Specs for Mitsubishi HC9000D

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MSRP: $9995, MAP $5995
Technology: LCoS (SXRD) 3 panels
Native Resolution: 1920×1200, 1080p actually 16:10 aspect ratio
Brightness: 1000 lumens claimed, 1005 lumens highest we measured (at full wide angle), 865 at our normal mid-point on the zoom lens range)
Contrast: 120,000:1
Zoom Lens ratio: 1.8:1
Lens shift: Vertical and horizontal, motorized
Lamp life: 2000 hours at full power
Weight: 33.1 lbs. (14.8 Kg)
Warranty: 2 Years Parts and Labor

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Mitsubishi HC9000D Special Features

HC9000D 3D Abilities

The HC9000D, like its competitors, relies on active shutter glasses. Mitsubishi figures they are selling a first class 2D projector and 3D’s not for everyone, so they skipped throwing in the usual 2 pair of active shutter glasses that some other manufacturers have included. (On the other hand, they did include an external wireless IR emitter, with the projector?) That at least gives you some choice from several different manufacturers of glasses that you should be able to use, when you decide you can no longer live without 3D.

The HC9000D handled 3D as well as any of the others to pass through here. Crosstalk seems to be minimal. I’m still playing with the different settings that seem to trade off crosstalk for brightness, in a lot of subtle steps. The default setting of 4.5 definitely works well. You can go to a lower number, likely reduce crosstalk or some other type of noise, but give up precious brightness.

Once again, we have a 1080p projector that can’t play ESPN 3D content. Like all of these projectors so far except the Sharp projector, they don’t support this one type of 720p 3D. That’s a nuisance.

I logged at least a dozen hours viewing 3D content. It’s the best I’ve seen so far, and that, in part, because it’s the brightest 1080p 3D capable projector to come through here yet, except for the well endowed LG CF3D. That beast though, isn’t for home.

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