The Art of Home Theater Projectors

A change in our Home Theater Projector reviews process

OK, heads up, things are changing, although only slightly.  With the goal in mind of cranking out a few more projector reviews a year, I’ve decided to job out, a bit of the work.  Starting with the next review, the Optoma HD65, I’ve got help with calibration and measurements.  Actually, I’ll be doing my usual watching of the projectors before any measurements to get a feel for their “out of the box” performance.  At that point, however, I’ll be calling Mike Rollett, who will take charge of all measurements and calibration.  Mike’s an old hand, and is also writing articles for my site. His first article written for us, is in an area of his specialty – universal remotes, and you can find a link on the left masthead on any page of our site (except this blog).  Mike is an experienced home theater integrator, a retired engineer and lawyer.  He just can’t stay away from this stuff.  A few years back, Mike taught me the basics of calibrating projectors, and, in fact, I bought my Optic One sensor/Avia Pro Calibration suite software, because it worked so well for him, and was easy enough for even me to learn.

OK, enough about Mike.  

He’ll pick up the projector, do the full range of measurements I’ve been doing, and some additional ones, and he’ll calibrate the “best” (usually labeled Cinema, or Theater, or similar) mode, and also do some tweaking of brightest modes, as needed.   

Fear not!  Each review will continue to provide the adjustments made when calibrating.  In fact, there should be more usable numbers, to get everyone started.

After a day or so at Mike’s, the projector will come back to me, for extensive watching in best and brightest modes, the usual photo shoot, and, then, finally, I’ll put in the usual grueling hours needed to write it all up, and publish it.

Who knows – with Mike on board for this, and a new light meter coming, we may even start providing contrast measurements and other goodies, that I’m occasionally asked for.  

Still, picture quality is king.  Specs are nice, numbers are nice, but the bottom line on each review will be how it works in the real world.  -art

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