The Art of Home Theater Projectors

Starting Our Projector Review of the Viewsonic PJD7820HD – 1080p, $699

Greetings projector fans!

I’ve got the PJD7820HD all fired up and am watching it.  This PJD7820HD was one of the most talked about projectors at Infocomm.  Why?

At $699, it’s a “crossover” projector, suitable for business use or home entertainment.  I do believe it’s the least expensive 1080P projector out there at the moment.  And it does offer full 3D including Blu-ray 3D thanks to having HDMI 1.4 and proper support, where as a number of other low cost Home Entertainment projectors do not support Blu-ray 3D!

I’m of course a fan of high performance projectors, but this relatively  small Viewsonic PJD-7820HD, although not a wiz at black levels and other high performance abilities, is a killer projector when it comes to lighting up a family room or living room.

To give you a taste of that, consider that Mike measured a wall melting 3696 lumens with the PJD7820HD  in brightest mode, and the lens at full wide angle. Mike calibrated Dynamic Movie mode and still managed to record over 2500 lumens!   Sunglasses anyone?

In fact, this projector obviously comes off the same assembly lines as the Acer H6510BD that I reviewed a couple of months ago,

Viewsonic's PJD7820HD offers 1080p performance at breakthrough price of $699

but they are far from identical once you get past the fact that they are exactly the same size, and have the lens, most inputs, etc. in exactly the same places.  The Viewsonic has the advantage of a lower selling price than the Acer, and much to my approval, it has two user savable memories, whereas I’ve complained about the savable memory issue recently about both the Acer, and the Optoma HD25-LV projector, whose review published last evening.  And of course, the firmware (which also means the image quality), should be noticeably different.

I’m going to try to get this published by the weekend, or at least before the sun rises next Monday morning.  From what I’ve seen so far, it looks to be the better choice for most, compared with that Acer.  OK, give me a few days to put this Viewsonic projector through its paces.

On the subject of other reviews, I’m slammed, so as previously mentioned (somewhere), I’ve given Tony the Epson Home Cinema 750HD.  This is Epson’s least expensive projector.  It’s only 720p, however, Tony tells me he’s really impressed, with how well it performs.  That should publish next week.  In addition I’ve got a Panasonic solid state light source projector in.  It’s pricey at around $3000 but claims 3500 lumens. Primarily a business/education/government projector, I suspect that it has some serious uses in entertainment, such as sports bars.  Having said that, that means it might also be a great high power home entertainment projector.

It even claims 20,000:1 contrast, same as the Optoma HD25-LV  I just reviewed, so it may well  have some pretty respectable blacks.   Most likely  that will publish in early August, perhaps the first projector reviewed in the new layout, and website design…   BTW I’m told there’s an interesting twist to the color lumens story with this Panasonic single chip DLP projector.  I can’t wait to see how that plays out.  I’ve got a pocket projector review coming up as well, or rather Tony does, he’s got the Optoma ML550, a pretty powerful pocket/pico projector, which he’ll review after the Epson.  Stay tuned.

 

News And Comments

  • http://www.projectorreviews.com/members/lisasonfeier/ Lisa Feierman

    Hi Kevin,

    I too would assume the blacks would be similar since they claim the same 20,000:1, but that’s conjecture. I would also have to assume that Dynamic Black works exactly the same way… But I really don’t like “guessing” when I’ve never had a look at the product close up. I’m curious though, the LV only managed to measure a maximum of 1915 lumens with a 3200 lumen claim. By comparison, the HD25 claims 2000. If it’s equally “optimistic” then it’s maximum “brightest” mode (at wide angle) would only be 1196 lumens, and calibrated at mid-zoom, would be about 935 calibrated with Brilliant Color cranked up to 10, and about 1/3 of that with Brilliant Color off, although we never calibrated without Brilliant color cranked up, since we consider the HD25-LV to be a projector for brighter room where the lumens are needed.