SIM2 Nero 3D-2 Projector Review

Dynamic Iris

Very nice, and very smooth, although, it doesn’t seem SIM2 is working it exceptionally hard. That is, blacks, while “ultra high contrast” are very good, but definitely not exceptional, and are bested by many less expensive projectors. When I say “ultra high contrast” that’s our indication that they are “good enough”, getting to that quality is, in our opinion, very important. Improving from there is great, but less critical.

3 Lens Choices

SIM2 offers three choices for the Nero series, which they describe as T1, T2, and T3.

Between them, the Nero 3D-2 has exceptional placement range. It can be placed almost anywhere in between 1.37 times screen width to 3.9 times screen width. There are a couple of small gaps in that range, which probably aren’t even worth mentioning. More details in theTour section

Nero 3D-2 3D Abilities

Overall, I’d have to say their implementation of 3D is rather good. 3D is particularly clean, cleaner than, I think, any of the LCoS projectors we’ve reviewed, although those are all half the price, or less.

Rather, I have the usual complaint that I’ve launched at every over $4000 3D capable projector I’ve reviewed to date – and that’s: Not enough lumens for enjoyably bright 3D on most screens. The Nero 3D-2 will do fine, brightness wise, in 3D

on smaller screens, such as 82″ or 92″ diagonal, with typical white screen surfaces. To go much larger, and really enjoy 3D, the best alternative is to go with a higher than normal gain screens, to make up for the lower lumens. I’d say 1.5 to 2.0 gain screens can make a real difference, but with the usual trade-offs, such as a narrowing seating range. A plan B, which some folks are doing, if practical for you, is to have two screens.

All considered, I did most of my 3D watching on my 1.3 gain Stewart Firehawk G3, at just under 100″ diagonal, and would have liked a step up in brightness. I’ll be installing a 2.5 gain, high power screen that arrived recently, and will report on how other projectors, similar to this Nero projector in brightness, perform on that much brighter screen.

I had no trouble with 3D coming from Blu-ray 3D, or any different 3D 1080 or 720 formats from any of the DirecTV 3D channels. The short version – everything 3D that I threw at it – worked.

Bottom line on 3D with the SIM2 3D-2: Nicely done within the limits of the projector’s brightness. Clean, no sign of rainbows for me (on 2D or 3D). Good stuff!

Let's talk 3D active glasses:

For 3D you have two options. SIM2 will work with glasses compatible with XPanD 103 glasses (as do Panasonic and Epson projectors, and a few others), but they also have their “proprietary” glasses option, which they claim is slightly better. The choice is yours, and the 103 compatibility means some 3rd party glasses should be obtainable for as little as $49, maybe less. (Not that anyone spending $20,000 on a projector is likely to worry too much about the price of a few pair of glasses.)

2D to Simulated 3D on the Nero 3D-2

This is becoming a standard line for me, but I still hope to find a projector that really nails 2D to 3D.

Basically I’ve yet to see 2D to 3D that I could recommend for anyone really into everything looking right. I’m sure most kids will love it. On the other hand, I think a projector is really going to have to be consistently excellent doing 2D to 3D, for most enthusiasts to consider using this feature. I haven’t seen that yet. But, I hear it’s coming.

If you don’t mind the little 3D “imperfections” due to 2D – to 3D conversion, plus the image being about 1/4 the brightness of 2D, and wearing the glasses, go for it. It’s not about watching perfection, it’s about satisfying your preferences. Not quite ready for serious primetime, but some will enjoy it.  Myself, so far, other than for testing purposes, I haven’t found the projector that makes me want to do it.

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