JVC DLA-RS4910, DLA-RS49, DLA-X500R Projector Review

DLA-RS4910 PROJECTOR HARDWARE TOUR:  Overview and Lens, Control Panel, Inputs and Connections

DLA-RS4910 Projector - Hardware Overview

JVC’s DLA-RS4910 and its siblings are moderately large projectors.  They are about the same size as the competing Sony’s, a about a half size larger than the Epson 5030UB or the Panasonic PT-AE8000U projectors.  Of late, the only home theater projectors to grace our theater that are larger, have been the two true 4K resolution Sony’s.  Both are about a 1/2 size larger than the JVC, mostly taller.  Pick one up, and the JVC feels very serious, weighing in at almost 35 pounds, heavier than the others just mentioned.

The motorized 2:1 zoom lens is center mounted.  All functions are motorized – zoom, focus, and lens shift.  You’ll find exhaust vents on the outside portion of the front.   You’ll also find the front IR sensor for the remote control, just to the left of the lens if you are facing the projector.  Down below the JVC RS4910 has four screw thread adjustable feet – two up front, to in the back (of course)!  Also down below is one air intake.

Nothing on the sides, or the top (other than the logo on the top).  The rest of the action is in the back.

At the outer edges of the back are two more intake vents.  facing the back , the inputs and other connectors are on the left side of the projector’s back.  In the center of the rear of the JVC is the control panel, and the door for lamp access is to the right.

 

 

RS4910 Control Panel

No surprises here, JVC hasn’t changed the control panel for the third year in a row.  Located in the center of the rear of the projector it’s a fairly standard affair.

The power switch (On/Standby) is at the top.  Press once to power on, press twice to power down.  Next down is the Input – the source selector.  Right below that is the OK (aka Enter) button.  Most projectors put that button in the center of the arrow keys, but not JVC.

Well, those four navigation arrow keys are next, and they are set up in the popular diamond configuration.

That leaves only the Menu button on the bottom left, and the Back button (often called Escape), which moves you back up a level in the menus when pressed.

All the standard features, nothing extra.  Nicely spaced out.  Works!  By putting it on the back, it should be less noticeable than if on the projector’s top (if mounted), as that would be facing down.

Click Image to Enlarge

JVC DLA-RS4910 Inputs and Connections

These JVC projectors have a few goodies, but are also missing some standard inputs.

From the top left of the rear of the RS4910, you’ll find two HDMI 1.4 inputs, and just to the right of them, is the RJ45 ethernet jack  for networking.    Slightly further right and down a bit is the rear IR sensor for the remote control.

Back of JVC's RS4910 Projector (and RS49, X500R)

Back of JVC’s RS4910 Projector (and RS49, X500R)

Right below the two HDMI inputs, is a standard RS232 Serial port with the usual DB9 connector.

Moving down and back to the left, there’s the DIN connector for the optional 3D RF emitter. To its right is a small jack for a 12 volt screen trigger.

That’s it folks, although I note that missing are some low res inputs – composite video, and S-video, but we’re definitely seeing more manufacturers no longer including those, especially on higher end projector models.

It would have been nice if one of the HDMI inputs was configured to support MHL, which would have allowed some internet smarts to be added, such as a Roku stick, or directly interfacing some android based phones and tablets!

We are starting to see HDMI with MHL in some home projectors, although mostly on the lower end of things.  It’s catching on rather quickly, as MHL has many benefits.  My Roku stick, for example would have allowed me to do Netflix directly, as well as many other online services.  Next year perhaps.

Note on MHL

Note: Of course, as one of our readers pointed out, after the RS4910 review was first posted, that a lot of what goes on with MHL, such as downloading movies and other content, has an audio component.   The JVC projectors currently don’t have either  a speaker, or an audio output.

I’d still like to see MHL, but let’s also ask for a digital audio out and a standard stereo audio out.

That would make movie watching off of my Roku stick work (assuming I have an audio system nearby.   I expect everyone with a home theater projector has some sound system!  Of course when I browse Roku’s offferings there are some games, and news sources which are strictly visual, no audio components.

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News And Comments

  • ScottJ97

    I’m not sure why you would expect or want an MHL input on a device that does not handle audio. (There’s no way to get the audio out.) Any system using this projector would have a better place to connect an MHL device, like a receiver.

    • ProjectorReviews.com

      Scott,

      Hi, you make a good point. I’ll amend my wish list and ask for MHL in, and a digital audio or other audio out as well.

      I’m going to add that to the review itself, thanks for noting that. -art

      • ScottJ97

        Sorry but I still don’t understand that wish. If there were an audio out, it would go to a receiver or such, which is also where an MHL device could be connected. Why would you ever want to connect an MHL device to this projector?