JVC DLA-HD250 Projector Review

The DLA-HD250 projector is almost identical to the RS25 and RS35 models. When it coJVC DLA-HD250 Physical Tourmes to this section which covers the physical aspects and abilities of the HD250, I’ve copied from the previous reviews making only the necessary changes. The differences are very few, and noted.

JVC DLA-HD250 Physical Appearance

The JVC DLA-HD250 projector can be shelf or ceiling mounted, and of course, it can be set on a table.

Physically, its a larger, medium sized projector. It’s total depth is just under nineteen inches and it is about fourteen and a half wide. Its height is just over six and a half inches. A motorized door keeps dust off the lens, by closing when the JVC HD250 is powered down. All four feet are screw thread adjustable.

The JVC DLA-HD250 comes finished in a flat gray-black (not quite black). It has a silverish trim ring around the lens and a cosmetic trim piece running from almost the front to the back, on the top, for “looks.”

As with the previous model – the RS15, you’ll find that the inputs are located on the right side (viewing from the front), just above the bottom. Of course, this will be a benefit for many who shelf mount. That is because they won’t need a few extra inches for connectors and cabling coming out of the back.

Replacing the lamp is easy. The lamp gets replaced from a removable panel in the center of the back of the projector. That means that here is no requirement to unmount the HD250, when ceiling mounted. (Some projectors have their lamp doors on the bottom, which would be covered by a ceiling mount).

Control Panel

Click to enlarge. so close. The HD250′s control panel is located on the top. In the image on the right, you are viewing the panel from the back of the projector. The three indicator lamps are closest to the front of the projector. They are: Warning, Lamp, and Standby/On.

Further back is the first button, the Power switch. It’s the usual press once for on, press twice for off. Next is the Input button, followed by a Hide button to black out the image.

Then comes the four arrow buttons in a diamond shaped arrangement, with a larger Enter button in the center.

Lastly, side by side, are the Menu, and (menu) Back button. Pretty standard stuff. Of course, we all primarily rely on the remote control, and probably only use the control panel during initial setup, if at all.

It’s a nice easy to use control panel. The buttons aren’t too close and differ by size, very helpful in the dark. Of course, most of us rely on the remote control.

Click Image to Enlarge

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JVC DLA-HD250Pro Projector Review

The DLA-HD250 projector is almost identical to the RS25 and RS35 models. When it comes to this section which covers the physical aspects and abilities of the HD250, I’ve copied from the previous reviews making only the necessary changes. The differences are very few, and noted.

JVC DLA-HD250 Physical Appearance

The JVC DLA-HD250 projector can be shelf or ceiling mounted, and of course, it can be set on a table.

Physically, its a larger, medium sized projector. It’s total depth is just under nineteen inches and it is about fourteen and a half wide. Its height is just over six and a half inches. A motorized door keeps dust off the lens, by closing when the JVC HD250 is powered down. All four feet are screw thread adjustable.

The JVC DLA-HD250 comes finished in a flat gray-black (not quite black). It has a silverish trim ring around the lens and a cosmetic trim piece running from almost the front to the back, on the top, for “looks.”

As with the previous model – the RS15, you’ll find that the inputs are located on the right side (viewing from the front), just above the bottom. Of course, this will be a benefit for many who shelf mount. That is because they won’t need a few extra inches for connectors and cabling coming out of the back.

Replacing the lamp is easy. The lamp gets replaced from a removable panel in the center of the back of the projector. That means that here is no requirement to unmount the HD250, when ceiling mounted. (Some projectors have their lamp doors on the bottom, which would be covered by a ceiling mount).

Control Panel

The HD250′s control panel is located on the top. In the image on the right, you are viewing the panel from the back of the projector. The three indicator lamps are closest to the front of the projector. They are: Warning, Lamp, and Standby/On.

Further back is the first button, the Power switch. It’s the usual press once for on, press twice for off. Next is the Input button, followed by a Hide button to black out the image.

Then comes the four arrow buttons in a diamond shaped arrangement, with a larger Enter button in the center.

Lastly, side by side, are the Menu, and (menu) Back button. Pretty standard stuff. Of course, we all primarily rely on the remote control, and probably only use the control panel during initial setup, if at all.

It’s a nice easy to use control panel. The buttons aren’t too close and differ by size, very helpful in the dark. Of course, most of us rely on the remote control.

Click Image to Enlarge

Input/Output

There seem to be no changes this year, in terms of I/O – inputs and outputs. Located on the side, from front to back, first there are two HDMI 1.3b compatible inputs. Next comes an analog PC input (standard HD15 connector), which the original RS1, and also the RS10 did not offer. I should note that the RS25 and HD250 both have the computer input, but the HD250 does not. (There are work arounds of course.)

Click Image to Enlarge

Next up, are three RCA connectors for the component video input, followed by another RCA connector for basic composite video. Next is the S-Video input, followed by the RS-232 connector for controlling the projector directly from a computer or room controller.

Add all of them up, and you have a fairly standard complement of inputs and outputs, with no surprises. As with all home theater projectors, I’d still like to see three HDMI ports, but I’ve only seen that on a couple of 1080p projectors so far.

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