Projector Reviews

AAXA P6X PORTABLE PICO PROJECTOR REVIEW – PERFORMANCE

AAXA P6X Portable Pico Projector Review – Performance: Color Modes, Brightness, Video Quality, Audio Quality, Audible Noise

COLOR MODES

The above screen shots are intended to give only a rough idea of the color accuracy for each picture mode. However, when viewed in person the color accuracy will generally look somewhat better than shown in these photos. The images show the difference in color and skin tones, for the different preset picture modes.

There are 3 factory color presets, 1 “user” preset option, and 3 brightness settings.

Color modes:

  • Vivid
  • Standard
  • Soft

Brightness modes:

  • Bright
  • Standard
  • Eco

When viewing in the “bright” brightness mode, the Vivid and Standard color modes appear the brightest, but when viewing in a dark room the image seemed to make skin tones greener than they should be, and the overall color felt over saturated. They are the best options for using the projector in a bright room though.

With minimal ambient light, “soft mode” seemed to produce the truest colors, which seemed worth the sacrifice in brightness compared to the other two modes. In a bright room, soft mode is hard to see. The user picture mode lets the user adjust contrast, brightness, color, and sharpness, so it can be fine-tuned to the user’s preference.

BRIGHTNESS

The P6X has a rated brightness of 1,100 LED lumens and AAXA does not provide a ANSI lumens brightness specification. I took 3-4 readings about 15-20% out from the center of the lens which usually gives a pretty good approximation of ANSI lumens. At full wide angle I measured the P6X in its brightest color and brightness modes: VIVID/BRIGHT.

Brightness: 641 Lumens

At wide zoom, VIVID/Bright modes, the P6X measured 641 lumens which very good for a projector this compact.

Brightness 

Color Mode Lumens
Vivid 641
Standard 358
Soft 323

To achieve maximum brightness the AAXA must be plugged into AC power. The AAXA max bright is reduce by about 15% when running on battery power because the BRIGHT lamp mode cannot be engaged.

VIDEO QUALITY

For a projector of its size and price range, the image is exceptionally bright, and viewers shouldn’t have any trouble viewing presentations or watching video in most environments. Like I mentioned above, I primarily used the “soft mode” for viewing content, but the screen shots above were taken with the P6X in “vivid” mode and “bright” to achieve the highest brightness.

Above are screenshots of a variety of HD videos and photos. Like all our photos, they remain unadjusted for color, so they do not look as good as what the projector produced.

Text smaller than 10pt was just barely readable. I can’t imagine anything smaller would be readable, but any text larger than the computer menus, such as movie subtitles and appropriately designed power point presentations are easily read.

The P6X has a claimed dynamic contrast ratio of 2,000:1. On my white screen, in a dark room, the contrast is sufficient enough to tell what is meant to be black, but to me it looks more like a very dark blue. While not a true black, I didn’t find the contrast ratio to be distracting, and would imagine most users won’t have an issue either. Overall, the video picture quality was decent for a projector of this type and price point.

AUDIO QUALITY

The P6X has a single 4W speaker, which is twice as powerful as its P6 predecessor. It is powerful enough to clearly hear in an average sized living room, but I would imagine people in the back of a larger conference room might struggle to hear it at full volume. While the speaker is loud enough, it doesn’t produce a super “crisp” or “clear” sound, but it is likely more than adequate for the intended use of a projector of this type. For those that require improved sound, there is a 3.5mm audio jack to connect an external speaker.

AUDIBLE NOISE

The P6X fans run from the moment the projector is turned on, and get consecutively louder with each brighter image setting. I would consider them slightly louder than average, but not distracting. At about ¾ of full volume, I could no longer hear the fans.

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