Projector Reviews

LG GRU510N Laser Projector Review – Summary

LG GRU510N Projector Review – Summary: Highlights, Pros and Cons

HIGHLIGHTS

The LG GRU510N is a 5000-lumen UHD (3840 x 2160) DLP projector with laser-phosphor illumination rated to deliver 20,000 hours of maintenance-free operation with no lamp replacements.

It offered accurate out-of-the-box color reproduction and it is one a few projectors with Dynamic HDR Tonemapping.
The combination of high output, high resolution, and smart wireless capabilities present a great value along with a very pleasing and flexible image. Compact size, HDBaseT, horizontal and vertical lens shift backed up by 12-point geometry correction combine to provide exceptional installation flexibility in this projector class.

While the design delivers cutting-edge technology and exceptional performance value, some considerations must be made. Smart wireless capabilities are not universal. There is no support for Apple devices (AirPlay) and MiraCast is frankly a hit or miss technology.

The inclusion of WebOS to access a web browser and display media is admirable. Still, the usefulness is limited compared to LG Smart TV and CineBeam Projector offerings where numerous apps can be accessed for content providers such as Netflix, Hulu, and Disney+.

If you are looking for a bright projector with accurate colors for a room with lots of ambient light and low maintenance is a priority, the GRU510N is definitely a projector you should consider.

VALUE PROPOSITION

When considering the competition for the GRU510N, there are very few worthwhile comparisons. No laser home theater projector at the GRU510N can match its brightness. A quick search for 5000 Lumen 4K HDR laser projectors results in two business models, the Optoma ZK507 and BenQ LK952.

The Optoma ZK507 utilizes the larger 0.66″ DLP chip, which should result in better native contrast, but it doesn’t offer a horizontal lens shift. The BenQ LK952 does offer horizontal and vertical lens shift, but it is much noisier. Lastly, neither the Optoma nor BenQ models offer dynamic HDR tone mapping, built-in wireless connectivity, or HDMI ARC.

For a darkened home theater, that price point, I would probably choose a more traditional bulb based projector like an Epson 6050UB. The Epson is nowhere near as bright, and you would have to deal with bulb replacement, but the black levels are significantly better. In a non-dedicated room full of ambient, the GRU510N would be the better choice due to its higher brightness and lower maintenance.

Pros

  • 5000 lumens
  • Laser Phosphor Illumination rated at 20,000 hours
  • UHD resolution (3840 x 2160)
  • Wide range of output and picture modes
  • Expert calibration capabilities
  • Compact Size
  • Quiet operation
  • Horizontal and Vertical lens shift
  • 12 point warping

Cons

  • Limited WebOS
  • No support for AirPlay
  • Does not support analog video connections (VGA, Composite, Component)