Projector Reviews

BenQ MH733 Projector Review – Summary

BenQ MH733 Projector Review – Summary: Summary, Pros, Cons

Summary

Overall, I was pretty pleased with this BenQ MH733 Full HD DLP Projector.  My expectations for single chip DLP projectors has diminished over the years as I have grown accustomed to 3LCD projectors (mostly Epson and Sony) coming with better color balance combined with more color lumens (while DLPs for similar dollars offer more white lumens).  So that said, with expectations typically tampered down, I really was impressed with the displayed brightness, overall sharpness of text and images, and the color surprised me on Cinema mode, performing admirably and providing more accurate colors than I was expecting overall.

For the presenter on the go, the boardroom regular, or the classroom workhorse, the BenQ MH733 comes stocked and loaded with features and wireless capabilities intended to one thing and one thing only, enhance your overall presentation.  The USB Reader for PC-Free projection is hands down the best USB Reader I have used for this purpose yet.  Without needing to convert files to a specific format suitable for the PC-Free projection feature, and a seamless, easy to use interface, it was an absolute pleasure to experience a USB Reader that worked the way it was supposed to, with no extra steps.  Plug in, go to the source if it doesn’t go automatically, choose your folders and file, and present!  With no need for a computer, you just eliminated some wires and a bunch of extra steps en route to presenting right on time because you didn’t have to mess with other inputs or connectors!

In addition to the USB Reader, the BenQ QCast app combined with USB Wireless dongle ($60-$100) makes for a versatile package that enables you to use special meeting features like split screens, mobile or PC device wireless connections, and mobile remote control.  As well, the MH733 is fully compatible with leading projector control systems including Crestron, AMX, PJ-Link, and Extron Control IP Link* for network control via LAN.  Similarly, BenQ’s Multiple Display Administrator (MDA) software provides powerful centralized multiple-projector management including automated opening and closing procedures for public spaces, remotely controlled power on and off, and scheduling for institutions and corporations.

Home Screen/Auto Search
Home Screen/Auto Search

The MH733 hardware itself felt very durable, in addition to having a strong compact shape, and managing to be light enough for easy travel when needed.  With an attached lens cover, not always a common feature, you can save your lens some more dust than would usually build up.  With a fairly common control panel on top, an input panel with 2 HDMI inputs and audio in and out, and a fully functional remote with laser pointer, the hardware package is sleek, strong, and functional for the most active of presenters.

When it came to image and audio quality and overall performance, the BenQ MH733 performed well.  The picture was sharp and clear but there was some fuzziness in darker scenes.  As stated earlier, color accuracy was better than I expected in Cinema mode, while the rest of the modes struggled more with colors though sRGB was not too bad.

On the brightest setting with wide-zoom, there was a 23% reduction from the manufacturers claim of 4000 lumens, for a total of 3093 lumens. Most projectors don’t hit claim, but down 23% is more than most. Offsetting that, is that the BenQ’s brightest mode – Bright – offers better color than most DLP competitors brightest modes.  If BenQ was only after getting the highest lumen counts, we’d end up with a projector with a lot more shift to green, a chronic problem for most projectors’ brightest modes.

Cinema Mode was able to put out about 2350 lumens so with the best color and picture, it’s a pretty solid amount of light coming out there.  Overall, solid brightness performance up against the manufacturer claims.  Now that’s on the money for a 4000 lumen DLP, or even better.  We find most DLPs when doing their best color, are down about 50% from claim.

Lastly, the 10 watt speaker was booming loud but unfortunately, if you need it to be low, this speaker did not appear quiet even at the lowest setting.  So while it will provide more than enough sound in many rooms, if you need speakers that can get a little quieter, you’re going to want some external adjustable speakers or you may need another projector.  Which is unfortunate because on the whole, the BenQ MH733 delivers a very versatile and affordable $800 projector, good for anyone on the go but more than capable for setting up shop across your school or place of business.

Pros

  • Very affordable $599 price tag
  • Full HD 1920 x 1080 picture
  • Compatible with most projector control systems including Crestron, AMX, PJ-Link, and Extron Control IP Link for network control via LAN.
  • 12 months or 2000 hour warranty
  • Truly easy to use USB Reader plays most of your files and documents without needing to convert anything!
  • QCast app compatibility when connected to the internet using BenQ’s wireless USB dongle.
  • Crisp, sharp text
  • 15,000 hours of lamp life in LampSave Mode
  • Corner Fit & 2D Keystone for optimum image adjustment wherever you need to present.

Cons

  • 10 Watt speaker is very loud but unfortunately the volume control does not enable the speaker to play at a low volume.   If you want the ability for a bit quieter sound, external speakers may be required.
  • Color performance in brightest modes is distorted.
  • 30% brightness reduction from the manufacturers claim of 4000 lumens.
  • Sometimes difficult to press control panel buttons and remote control button.
  • Might feel heavy for someone on the go despite being very portable

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