Projector Reviews

Epson Powerlite Pro G7905U Projector Review: Features 2

EPSON PRO G7905U PROJECTOR REVIEW – SPECIAL FEATURES:  Edge Blending and Projection Mapping, Interchangeable Lenses, Input Lag Measurement

G7905 Does Edge Blending

Edge blending is accomplished using multiple projectors in an array.  They will have the ability to take a single image and spread it over those multiple projectors, which combine to present the content as one large image, without visible differences in color or brightness from one projector to the next.

In other words it should appear seamless – as if done by a single projector.

Note, if you need projection mapping as well as edge blending, you’ll need to move up to the new Epson Laser series, which supports both.   Projection mapping – if you are not familiar is masking the image digitally to light up non-traditional,  often unusual (non-rectangular), and often, three dimensional objects.  (Sometimes used at rock concerts, but also for museum and digital signage applications, among others.)

The Powerlite Pro G7905  can even do edge blending on curved surfaces.  What it can’t do, is edge blending and pixel shifting, at the same time, but that’s fair, since we’re talking a multiple projector array, you shouldn’t need pixel shifting at all.

These Epsons have the necessary controls to match color across up to nine projectors, as well as brightness.

This image immediately below shows a two projector edge blend, with the output from one projector outlined in yellow, the other in red.  Note that the sky, the buildings, etc. do not show a change in brightness caused by the two images overlapping each other!

Epson edge blending
A two Epson projector edge blend.

Epson’s been serving up projectors doing edge blending and projection mapping for several years now.  Their demonstrations at trade shows show impressive capability (as do demos from Sony, Christie, Panasonic and others).

Here’s a link to an under a minute video clip of an Epson display at a trade show, using multiple projectors for both edge blending and projection mapping.  Epson Large Venue Projectors at Infocomm 2015: Projection Mapping   BTW those moving targets – are being moved by industrial robots Epson manufactures.  I thought that was cool.

Array of Interchangeable lenses

The Epson PowerLite Pro G7905 come with Epson’s standard zoom lens.  Epson also offers the G7905 UNL (“No Lens”) without the standard zoom (for $300 less).

Including the standard zoom lens that comes with the U version, Epson offers nine motorized lenses to choose from, including an ultra-short throw lens!  Epson uses a quick release bayonet mounting system for the lenses.  That will make rental and staging companies very happy, as they may need different lenses on different rental jobs.

If you look at the full range of lenses, you’ll see there’s almost continuous placement coverage from ultra-short throw, to the longest “back of the auditorium” telephoto lens.  (There is only a gap between the ultra short throw and the next widest angle lens, which should not be surprising!)

The easiest way to show you what Epson has for the G7905 projector is to display this Epson provided chart, which includes throw range numbers:

Lens Optons for Epson Pro G7905 Projector
Epson’s nine available lenses will let you place the projector as close as 7 feet and as far back as 200 feet from a 20 foot wide screen!

 

Input Lag Measurement

For you gamers out there, or organizers of game playing events, or those with other applications where input lag is a factor, the G7905U surprised us, with a pretty respectable 30.9ms delay based on measuring with the Leo Bodnar input lag measurement tool we have  (that is now widely used in the industry)   That’s not world class speed for gaming, still a lot slower than a specialty gaming monitor, but fast enough to satisfy most gamers, including many serious ones.  If you are running a gaming event and need a bright projector so fans can follow the action, this Epson should be easily fast enough for your application.