Projector Reviews

Epson Pro L1755UNL Laser Projector Review- Hardware

Epson Pro L1755UNL Projector Review – Hardware: Overview, Control Panel, Inputs & Connectors

Front Beauty Shot of the L1775UNL showing the recessed zoom lens

The Pro L1755UNL and Pro L1750UNL are black and white versions of the same projector. While not as small as my home theater projector, I was surprised how small these projectors are considering they are capable of delivering 15,000 lumens.

Dimensions, including the feet, are: 23.1″ x 19.4″ x 8.3″
I am not aware of another company that offers a more compact, high brightness, large venue projector.

While the L1755UNL and L1750UNL may be relatively compact, they are solid – the chassis weighing in at 47.8 pounds (53.2lb with the standard lens, not included).

HARDWARE OVERVIEW

All the Epson Pro L series compatible lenses are motorized and most provide focus, lens shift and zoom (note: the ultra-short lens does not offer zoom). With that Epson provides lens memory capabilities for 10 separate savable settings, which is a benefit for many as such rental and staging companies.

Large exhausts are located on either side of the center mounted lens area. There’s a front IR sensor for the remote. The auto calibration camera is in the area below and to the right of the lens.

Unlike other models in the Epson Pro L series lineup, the Pro L1755UNL is not packaged with a standard lens but the projector is compatible with nine powered lenses. Upon detecting certain installed lenses, the projector will adjust its maximum brightness level as outlined in the chart below. Also included on the chart is the throw range numbers for each lens.

For those wanting more information on the nine lenses, go to the last page of this review, and click the data sheet, which has more lens information.

All the Epson Pro L series compatible lenses are motorized and most provide focus, lens shift and zoom (note: the ultra-short lens does not offer zoom). With that Epson provides lens memory capabilities for 10 separate savable settings, which is a benefit for many as such rental and staging companies.

Large exhausts are located on either side of the center mounted lens area. There’s a front IR sensor for the remote. The auto calibration camera is in the area below and to the right of the lens.

Unlike other models in the Epson Pro L series lineup, the Pro L1755UNL is not packaged with a standard lens but the projector is compatible with nine powered lenses. Upon detecting certain installed lenses, the projector will adjust its maximum brightness level as outlined in the chart below. Also included on the chart is the throw range numbers for each lens.

For those wanting more information on the nine lenses, go to the last page of this review, and click the data sheet, which has more lens information.

CONTROL PANEL

Epson Pro L1755UNL Indicator Lights
Epson Pro L1755UNL Indicator Lights

The Pro 1755UNL control panel is located on the back of the projector to the right of all the inputs. Note that the indicator lights usually found near the control panel on most projectors are located on the top front of the projector.

On the top left of the control panel is the power switch – press once to power up. The Off switch (Standby) is to its right you must press it twice to power the projector down. Below those buttons are the Source Search button and then, further down to the left is the Menu button, the Esc(ape) button is to the right. Escape takes you back up one level in the menus when pressed. One row down are the navigation buttons which include four arrows in a round layout formation with the Enter button in the middle of the arrow keys. 

When not in the menu system, each of the arrows has another function Left arrow brings up the Control Panel lock menu, where you can lock out use of the panel for security. The up arrow brings up the keystone correction menu, while the right arrow doubles as the A/V Mute. The down arrow brings up the first of 9 test patterns built into the projector (a black and white checkerboard pattern).

Epson L1775UNL Control Panel which includes direct lens control
Epson L1775UNL Control Panel which includes direct lens control

The final row on the left is the A/V Mute button which turns the video and audio on or off. To the right is the Lens button which brings up the lens shift, zoom, focus, and distortion adjustment screens. Also, if you hold Lens for 3 seconds, the lens will return to its home position.

I can see where having the control panel right next to all the inputs and networking connections would be a real advantage during rental and staging installs so you only have to access one area of the projector. 

INPUTS AND CONNECTORS

The back panel of the Epson Pro L1755 projector contains the control panel along with all inputs and connectors
The back panel of the Epson Pro L1755 projector contains the control panel along with all inputs and connectors

Starting from the top left, there is a standard RJ45 ethernet LAN (local area network) connector. Beside it is the HDBaseT connector (also RJ45) for running HDMI over CAT6 cabling up to 100 meters. Next to the HDBaseT is the DVI-D connector. The DVI-D has no analog compatibility, so you can’t utilize it as an extra component video or analog computer input. Beside the DVI-D is the HDMI input (with HDCP 2.2 copy protection needed for the new 4K standards like Blu-ray UHD). My only criticism is the lack of an additional HDMI input. While DVI-D is a viable alternative, it is not compatible with a lot of 4K sources, especially those that require HDMI 2.0 and HDCP 2.2 for compatibility. The DisplayPort that is found on most of the Epson G series projectors has been removed. Moving further to the right is a USB service port, and lastly, the 3G-SDI coaxial input for running long lengths (up to 100 meters) of live video.

On the second row of connectors, from the left you’ll find a small Kensington Lock slot for security, then the five BNC connectors, for component video (or other compatible sources). To the right, is a small jack labeled “Remote”, for hard wiring the remote when range or location makes the infra-red unreliable.

The third and fourth rows are a cluster containing an analog computer input and a monitor out – both with standard HD15 connectors, surrounded by 3 stereo audio inputs and one stereo audio out – all using the usual stereo-mini connector. That leaves only the “old school” RS-232C serial port of command and control.

Bottom Line: Overall, the L1755UHL is well equipped, with my only complaint being that there should be one or two additional HDMI inputs. While you can convert a HDMI source to HDBaseT, it would definitely be beneficial to have at least two HDMI inputs.