Projector Reviews

JVC DLA-X70R Performance 3

Light Leakage

JVC has always used a larger panel in terms of pixels than the 1920×1080 which makes up 1080p. As a result there has always been some extra light, beyond the screen edge. In the image below (RS45 easier to see than the X70R), you can see a thin band around the screen (actually brightest in the upper right and lower left corners) that is the output from those extra pixels.

No matter, the blacks are so black with the JVC DLA-X70 R projector, that they are barely visible on the screen, or a white wall, unless there’s no other light – no image on the screen, and your eyes have had a chance to adjust.

Click Image to Enlarge

Image Noise

I didn’t spot the minor, and not very often panning issues that we saw with the JVC RS45. This is a higher end model, and likely? has some better or additional image processing.

Overall, the JVC is pretty clean until you start playing with sharpness control, or the dynamic Detail Enhancement. As you raise those settings, existing noise that hasn’t been noticeable at normal seating can become noticeable, or even extremely noticeable, as you push those controls to settings above 25.

3D noise: Discussed elsewhere, as well. This is another JVC projector that just doesn’t have great 3D. Crosstalk / ghosting was more evident on the X70 than most other 3D projectors including those selling for a fraction of the price.

Definitely a lot worse than any DLP projector we’ve looked at, as they natively seem to lack any significant crosstalk, due to their different operation, but also worse than the other 3D capable projectors to recently pass though here. 3D remains a JVC weakness. Of course, even those of us really into 3D, only get to use their projectors so often due to the limited 3D content so far, so it can be easy to forgive. I watched most of Hugo on the JVC last night – the Blu-ray disc itself isn’t great, as far as 3D goes, but 3D related issues were definitely more noticeable than on, for example, the Panasonic PT-AE7000 or Epson Home Cinema 5010, two projectors that sell for not much more than 1/3 the price.

Seriously though, Hugo still was great to watch. If you can’t stand imperfection, even in 3D, then this JVC isn’t for you. But considering between image noise like crosstalk, color accuracy, etc., perfect 3D doesn’t seem to be an option. The JVC X70R is more than watchable in 3D. In fact, it’s relatively limited brightness in 3D combined with outstanding blacks, to produce blacks nothing this side of a CRT projector can match.

From a crosstalk standpoint, just about every other projector is at least a bit cleaner. It’s another reason why the 3D is not a strength of this projector. For the casual/occasional 3D viewer, the extra crosstalk probably isn’t an issue at all, but for the type of enthusiasts, and “purists” that tend to be drawn to JVC projectors, 3D may be a real disappointment.

Let me put it another way, while the DLA-X70’s 3D noise issues may be real, it definitely wouldn’t stop me from buying this projector.

Audible Noise

Large projectors have the room to baffle noise and end up quieter than smaller projectors. This JVC X70R is not particularly quiet at full power, but it is a good deal less noisy than some, including the previously mentioned Epson. the X70 is quieter than a number of competitors, including most single chip DLP models (probably all of them), and some of the rest.

In low power, consider the JVC to be silent, for all practical purposes. 20 db is quieter than all but a few projectors we’ve reviewed – in any mode.

Bottom line on audible noise: The JVC DLA-X70R’s handling of fan noise is first class, it’s reasonably quiet at full power, and downright quiet at low. No issues here, and a distinct advantage for this JVC compared to much of the competition.