Projector Reviews

BenQ GP1 Sharpness

BenQ GP1 Sharpness

The BenQ GP1 produces a reasonably sharp image, and focuses easily. If you are feeding it higher resolution source material, from a computer, or perhaps hi-res photos through the USB input, or an HDTV or Blu-ray source over component video, the relative lack of sharpness is more due to the projector being lower resolution than the material, than any issue with the optics. That said, the GP1’s resolution is SVGA (actually a little wider), which is a lot more pixels than the typical VGA (640×480) found on the smaller pico projectors.

Light Leakage

None!

Audible Noise

Impressively quiet. The BenQ GP1 does have a fan to keep it cool. With the presence of a fan, comes fan noise, the primary source of audible noise on projectors. The BenQ GP1, however, despite the small box (less ability to baffle the sound), it is impressively quiet. BenQ claims 28db, and I’ll definitely believe that. It is quieter than a lot of home theater projectors (though still a good bit noisier than the quietest, and a lot quieter than most business projectors. Audible noise is not going to be a problem.

BenQ GP1 Joybee Projector - Projector Screens

General Screen Recommendations:

I suspect that a lot of folks won’t be buying a projector screen to use with the Joybee. Rather, they will project onto a white or near white wall. Mini-screens do exist, including those that retract into a tube. I’ve seen such small screens in sizes from about 16″ diagonal. They can be opened up, and set on a table. By the way, I recommend finding a mini-tripod for setting up the projector. You can just put it on a table, but those flexible mini-tripods are a nice touch. They weigh only a few ounces and are typically less than 6 inches long.

Click Image to Enlarge

If you are going to get a screen, I’d suggest a high gain screen if possible. That will help with ambient light, and provide some extra brightness. Some mini-screens come in high gain surfaces. One example is the Da-Lite Presenter screen shown here. It is 40″ diagonal, sells for around $199, and has a particularly bright surface.

For a lot less money (around $50), Draper makes a 25″ diagonal tabletop screen for Joybee projectors. I can’t say that I’ve actually seen one, but here’s an image I found. It folds up into a portfolio case shape.

If you project onto a wall, and it’s not pure white, try out the Wall Color feature of the GP1. To give you an idea of how that feature adjusts color, here are two shots, one with Wall color off, and one with it set to light green. The wall of my kitchen is a yellowish off-white. Below are two images, the first was taken with Wall color turned off, and the second with it set to yellow:

All considered, if you want the best picture quality out of the BenQ GP1 a small screen is recommended. Still, any white wall will do fine, and with the Wall Color option, even some off-white/slightly colored walls will work reasonably well, too!

BenQ Joybee GP1 LED Projector - Warranty

BenQ provides a one year parts and labor warranty on their Joybee GP1 projector.

While it does not come with it’s own warranty, the LED light source is rated by BenQ as having a life of 20,000 hours (that compares to, typically 2000 to 4000 hours on most lamps going into larger projectors).

To launch the GP1, BenQ is offering a free extended two year warranty though July 31, 2009. (Only available through a couple of review sites, I’m told). To learn more, and register for the extended warranty click here! You’ll need to complete the page and put in our promo code: CIN0001