JVC DLA-RS10 Projector Calibration and Settings

Light Leakage

Seems like JVC projectors leak light all over the place, out of the lens. This is especially true if you are using a lot of vertical lens shift. That’s the bad news. The good news is that while it covers a wide area, it’s so dark as to be a non-issue. I remember still being able to spot the faint light on my off-white front wall of my theater when I reviewed the RS2 last year (and more so, with my RS1), but only on very dark scenes, and if looking! With my now dark, rust colored walls, the newer RS10’s light leak is invisible to my eyes in a completely darkened room.

JVC DLA-RS10 Image Noise

JVC uses higher end Silicon Optix for their image processing. They are using the Silicon Optix Reon-VX. Good stuff! The Reon-VX is found in a number of excellent projectors. I’m not aware of any notable flaws in image processing. Mosquito noise is just visible, in normal amounts, without the Noise Reduction engaged. I don’t see a need to implement it, but that is personal taste. Performance on motion artifacts is very good. As you can imagine, the RS10 easily passes all the other related related tests on the HQV test disc, as that widely used test disc is put out by Silicon Optix.

DLA-RS10 Audible Noise

The new JVC RS10 is definitely quieter than my old RS1, and therefore also the RS2. It’s still not the quietest projector around, but JVC is now claiming an impressive 19db in low lamp mode (Normal). It is also quieter than the older models in high lamp mode (High). It is now quieter than just about all the DLP projectors, and a bit quieter than the Epson Home and Pro Cinema series projectors (3LCD). On the other hand, it still makes more audible noise than the extremely quiet Panasonic and Mitsubishi home theater projectors.

Of course, none of that matters. What does matter, is whether it is quiet enough for your room and your sensitivity. In Normal mode, no one is going to have an issue. In High mode, a very small group of folks might, but I doubt that it will be a deal breaker for anyone. JVC lowered the audible noise enough (High mode) to take it out of the major concern category for most people who have the projector mounted almost directly overhead. If shelf mounted, it should not be an issue, as the shelf itself will absorb some of the sound eminating from the RS10. Let’s put it this way – if the RS10 is still to noisy for you, then you will find that there are only a handful of projectors that can do noticeably better in this regard, and I believe all of them are of the lower cost LCD projector variety.

JVC DLA-RS10 Projector Calibration and Settings

We calibrate each home theater that is reviewed. Normally we just do a basic grayscale calibration, along with the usual brightness, contrast, saturation, and other basic adjustments. That is the case for the DLA-RS10 as well, and I should note, different, than what you will find in the recent RS20 review. That projector has an advanced color management system, and, that projector needs it. The RS10 is setup differently and does very nicely with the “basics”.

The JVC DLA-RS10 is one of the more expensive home theater projectors out there (without considering those five figure 3 chip DLP projectors). If you are spending “the big bucks” for an RS10, you will certainly want it to perform at its best.

We recommend a good professional calibration (several hundred dollars, sometimes more). Failing that, you can do most of the important adjustments with the use of a good end user calibration disc. I call them “end user” because they are very step by step. Allow a good hour to do your first calibration. There’s a review on the site for the DVE-HD disc. If you don’t like Plan A, or Plan B, try Plan C. That would be to plug in all of our post-calibration settings. They should definitely provide better results than just “out of the box” performance. There is variation, though from unit to unit, due to the lamp variation. Still, our settings will get you close!

The JVC DLA-RS10 is one of the more expensive home theater projectors out there (without considering those five figure 3 chip DLP projectors). If you are spending “the big bucks” for an RS10, you will certainly want it to perform at its best.

We recommend a good professional calibration (several hundred dollars, sometimes more). Failing that, you can do most of the important adjustments with the use of a good end user calibration disc. I call them “end user” because they are very step by step. Allow a good hour to do your first calibration. There’s a review on the site for the DVE-HD disc. If you don’t like Plan A, or Plan B, try Plan C. That would be to plug in all of our post-calibration settings. They should definitely provide better results than just “out of the box” performance. There is variation, though from unit to unit, due to the lamp variation. Still, our settings will get you close, and possibly better than your own work with a calibration disc.

JVC DLA-RS10 Color Temperature

First, here are the color temperature measurements for the Cinema 1 “best” mode.

These are the measurements, taken “right out of the box”:
30 IRE (dark gray)6387K
50 IRE (medium gray)6357K
80 IRE (light gray)6293K
100 IRE (white)6181K

Those numbers are not too far below the ideal 6500K, however, a quick adjust of the color offset setting for red, to -2, and blue, to -1 improves that notably, our post calibration settings much further improve the image.

With Red offset at -2, Blue offset at -1
30 IRE (dark gray)6476K
50 IRE (medium gray)6493K
80 IRE (light gray)6372K
100 IRE (white)6196K

For those interested, here are the color temperature measurement for white (100 IRE), for each of the five preset modes

Header Content
Cinema 16181K
Cinema 25176K
Natural6209K
Stage7288K
Dynamic8179K

Ok, time to see what we can do with the projector to perfect the image.

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